OECS Commission observes Meteorological Day

OECS Commission observes Meteorological Day

OECS Media Release

World Meteorological Day is celebrated annually on March 23 to commemorate the entry into force in 1950 of the convention that created the World Meteorological Organization (WMO). The day also highlights the huge contribution that National Meteorological and Hydrological Services make to the safety and well-being of society (1).  This year, World Meteorological Day will be celebrated under the theme “Weather-ready, Climate-smart.”

The world’s growing population faces a myriad of hazards such as tropical cyclone storm surges, heavy rains, heatwaves and droughts among others.  With climate change, weather events are becoming more extreme and more frequent. Urbanisation further exposes populations and makes them more vulnerable to the effects of climate change.  Consequently, we need to be weather-ready, climate-smart and water-wise.

Among the priorities of the WMO and National Meteorological and Hydrological Services (NMHSs) is to protect lives, livelihoods and property from the weather-related risks, climate and water-related events. This work therefore supports that 2030 agenda for sustainable development which includes climate change adaptation and disaster risk reduction.

Specifically, the WMO and National Meteorological Services offer services such as daily weather forecasts and longer-term climate predictions to assist society with being weather ready and climate smart.  In addition, to be water-wise, National Hydrological Services play a role in the management of fresh water resources for agriculture, industry, energy and human consumption.

Moreover, early warning systems (EWS) and other disaster risk reduction measures play a critical role in building the resilience of our communities.  Further, hydrological monitoring increases our understanding of the water cycle and therefore supports water management. All of these weather and climate-related services can contribute to making informed decisions regarding climate change mitigation and adaptation.

(1): http://www.greeningtheblue.org

Sources: World Meteorological Organization , Weather Ready Climate Smart   

Contact us
Norma Cherry-Fevrier Programme Officer, Social & Environmental Development Division, Organisation of Eastern Caribbean States
E. Crispin d'AUVERGNE Climate Change & Disaster Risk Management Coordinator,Social & Environmental Development Division, Organisation of Eastern Caribbean States
OECS Communications Organisation of Eastern Caribbean States
Norma Cherry-Fevrier Programme Officer, Social & Environmental Development Division, Organisation of Eastern Caribbean States
E. Crispin d'AUVERGNE Climate Change & Disaster Risk Management Coordinator,Social & Environmental Development Division, Organisation of Eastern Caribbean States
OECS Communications Organisation of Eastern Caribbean States
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The Organisation of Eastern Caribbean States (OECS) is an International Organisation dedicated to economic harmonisation and integration, protection of human and legal rights, and the encouragement of good governance among independent and non-independent countries in the Eastern Caribbean. The OECS came into being on June 18th 1981, when seven Eastern Caribbean countries signed a treaty agreeing to cooperate with each other while promoting unity and solidarity among its Members. The Treaty became known as the Treaty of Basseterre, so named in honour of the capital city of St. Kitts and Nevis where it was signed. The OECS today, currently has eleven members, spread across the Eastern Caribbean comprising Antigua and Barbuda, Commonwealth of Dominica, Grenada, Montserrat, St. Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, St Vincent and The Grenadines, British Virgin Islands, Anguilla, Martinique and Guadeloupe. 

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