Anguilla fisherfolk launch climate change & fisheries video

Anguilla fisherfolk launch climate change & fisheries video

CANARI Media Release

With the support of the Caribbean Natural Resources Institute (CANARI), Anguilla fisherfolk have created a new video entitled “Anguilla’s Fishing Dilemma” highlighting the impacts of climate change on the fisheries sector and priorities for action to build their resilience.  

These key impacts include rising ocean temperatures, coral bleaching and more extreme hurricanes and storms that damage their fishing grounds, fish landing sites, boats and other gear. These impacts also lead to shifts in fish distribution and increases in fishing effort and costs.

The video was developed as part of the Darwin Plus project, Climate change adaptation in the fisheries of Anguilla and Montserrat.  This project is being implemented by CANARI in partnership with the Department of Fisheries and Marine Resources – Anguilla, Fisheries and Ocean Resources Unit – Montserrat and the Centre for Resource Management and Environmental Studies (CERMES) – University of the West Indies.

Using a participatory process, CANARI supported the fisherfolk as well as other coastal and marine resource users and managers in Anguilla to jointly identify the topic, draft a story board and script, and collect and edit video footage at various sites to produce the video.  The fisherfolk also selected specific groups to target for the video, including key policy makers needed to enable changes in policy and practice in the fisheries sector.  

This participatory process helped to build their capacity to communicate effectively about climate change and use participatory video as a tool to document their local perspectives on climate change, its impacts and priorities for action for awareness raising and advocacy.

CANARI and the Department of Fisheries and Marine Resources – Anguilla are continuing to work with the Anguilla fisherfolk and other coastal and marine stakeholders to disseminate the participatory video and enable knowledge exchange to adapt and build resilient fisheries and related livelihoods.

 

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About the project: The Darwin Plus: Overseas Territories Environment and Climate Fund project, Climate change adaptation in the fisheries of Anguilla and Montserrat, aims to mainstream climate change adaptation into fisheries governance and management in Anguilla and Montserrat using an ecosystem approach to fisheries (EAF).  The project is being implemented by CANARI, the Department of Fisheries and Marine Resources – Anguilla, the Fisheries and Ocean Resources Unit – Montserrat, and the Centre for Resource Management and Environmental Studies (CERMES) of the University of the West Indies from 2017 – 2020 with total funding of £260,925.  See here for more information: http://www.canari.org/climate-change-adaptation-in-the-fisheries-of-anguilla-and-montserrat.

About CANARI: The Caribbean Natural Resources Institute (CANARI) is a regional technical non-profitorganisation which has beenworking in the islands of the Caribbean for 30 years.  Our mission is to promoteequitable participation and effective collaboration in managing natural resources critical to development.  Ourprogrammes focus on capacity building, policy planning and development, research, sharing and disseminationof lessons learned, and fostering regional partnerships.  

   This story aligns with OECS Strategic Objective No.2: Mainstream climate, economic, environmental and social resilience.
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Ainka Granderson The Caribbean Natural Resources Institute (CANARI)
Ainka Granderson The Caribbean Natural Resources Institute (CANARI)
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The Organisation of Eastern Caribbean States (OECS) is an International Organisation dedicated to economic harmonisation and integration, protection of human and legal rights, and the encouragement of good governance among independent and non-independent countries in the Eastern Caribbean. The OECS came into being on June 18th 1981, when seven Eastern Caribbean countries signed a treaty agreeing to cooperate with each other while promoting unity and solidarity among its Members. The Treaty became known as the Treaty of Basseterre, so named in honour of the capital city of St. Kitts and Nevis where it was signed. The OECS today, currently has eleven members, spread across the Eastern Caribbean comprising Antigua and Barbuda, Commonwealth of Dominica, Grenada, Montserrat, St. Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, St Vincent and The Grenadines, British Virgin Islands, Anguilla, Martinique and Guadeloupe. 

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